Avabaddalu | Instant Andhra Mango Mustard Pickle by Padma Desaraju

This recipe for Avabaddalu, an instant Andhra Mango Mustard Pickle, is something I learnt from my cousin Padma Desaraju this past weekend, when I visited her to see her newborn granddaughter (by extension my granddaughter too :)).

Avabaddalu | Instant Andhra Mango Mustard Pickle
Avabaddalu | Instant Andhra Mango Mustard Pickle

Padma is a treasure trove of traditional Andhra cooking and a wonderful cook; someone who can take the simplest of ingredients and transform it into a magical dish from it. This recipe for Avabaddalu is a testament to this fact and one of the many recipes I hope she contributes to this blog.

Avabaddalu literally means “mustard-y pieces” (as you can see I am making up words as I go along) and if you love raw mango (mammidikaya/kairi) and mustard then this is THE recipe for you. All you have to do is grind together some mustard seeds, green chillies and add the paste to raw mango pieces along with some salt and asafoetida. Voila! your instant pickle is ready.

Also try these recipes for pickles and chutneys with mango: Kanda Kairi, Methamba, and Mammidikaya Mukkalu.

How to Make Avabaddalu | Instant Andhra Mango Mustard Pickle

Avabaddalu | Mango Pieces Pickled in Mustard Green Chilli Paste
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Avabaddalu | Instant Andhra Mango Mustard Pickle
Prep Time
10 mins
Cook Time
5 mins
Total Time
15 mins
 

Avabaddalu is a traditional recipe for a Mango Mustard Pickle that can be savoured almost as soon as it is made. I love it because it is a blend of sour mango, bitter mustard, and spicy chilli.

Course: Accompaniment, Side Dish, Sides
Cuisine: Andhra Recipes, Indian, South Indian
Author: Aruna
Ingredients
  • 1 Cup Finely Chopped Mango Pieces, Mammidikaya Mukkalu About 200 gms
  • 1.5 tbsp Mustard Seeds, Avalu
  • 3-5 Spicy Green Chillies. Pacchi Mirapakaya Adjust to your level of spiciness
  • 1/3 tsp Asafoetida, Inguva
  • 3-4 tbsp Sesame Oil, Nuvvula Nune, Gingelly Oil
  • Salt to Taste, Uppu
Instructions
  1. Wash and dry the mango thoroughly.

  2. Chop to small pieces and set aside.

  3. Grind the mustard seeds, green chillies, salt, and 3 tbsp oil together to a fine paste.

  4. Add the mustard paste and asafoetida to the mango pieces.

  5. Mix well.

  6. Add a sesame oil, if required, and mix well.

  7. Let the Avabaddalu rest and pickle for about an hour.

  8. Enjoy Avabaddalu!

  9. To store Avabaddalu, refrigerate it!

Recipe Notes
  • I use sea salt/rock salt and so ground it along with the Mustard seeds. If you are using table salt, you can add it later as well.

 

Step-by-Step Method to Make Avabaddalu with Pictures

  1. Choose a mango that is sour, typically dark green and firm.
  2. Wash the mango and dry it thoroughly as moisture will spoil any pickle. I typically wipe it dry and then set it aside for 10-15 minutes.
  3. Chop to the mango to small pieces (along with the peel) and set aside.
  4. Using the dry grinder and grind the mustard seeds, green chillies, salt, and 3 tbsp oil together to a fine paste. Alternatively, you can just dry grind the mustard seeds with the chillies into a powder and add it along with the salt and oil to mango pieces.
  5. Now add the finely ground mustard paste to the mango pieces. Also add the asafoetida.
  6. Using a dry spoon, mix well till all mango pieces are well-coated with the mustard paste. Add more sesame oil, if required and if the mango pieces seem dry.
  7. Cover and set aside the Avabaddalu to rest for about an hour. In this time, the mango pieces will release some sour flavour and absorb the mustard flavour.
  8. The best way to enjoy Avabaddalu is to simply mix it with some hot rice!
  9. If you want to store Avabaddalu, refrigerate it. It stays fresh for about 2 weeks.
Ava Baddalu
Ava Baddalu

Grated Carrot Curry | Carrot Turumu Talimpu

Grated Carrot Curry
Grated Carrot Curry

Well, this Grated Carrot Curry is midway between a salad and a curry. I like it for its simplicity and the fact that it is so very easy to make. For me easy-to-make is a must on weekdays, as I often have to cook and leave for work!

I also love this curry because it is very light on the stomach and so is ideal on a hot summer day when you don’t want to eat too much or then when you are on a diet! 🙂

I have this Carrot Turumu Talimpu with rotis or just by itself as a salad.

Do you like carrots? Try the recipes for Gajar ka Halwa, Carrot Ginger Soup, Roasted Carrot Soup, Carrot Hesarubele Kosambari, and Carrot Payasam.

How to Make Grated Carrot Curry

 

Grated Carrot Curry
Grated Carrot Curry
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Print Recipe
This grated carrot curry is between a salad and a curry. It tastes great with rotis and is one of my go-to dishes when I want something light.
Servings Prep Time
4 People 15 Mins
Cook Time
10 Mins
Servings Prep Time
4 People 15 Mins
Cook Time
10 Mins
Grated Carrot Curry
Grated Carrot Curry
Yum
Print Recipe
This grated carrot curry is between a salad and a curry. It tastes great with rotis and is one of my go-to dishes when I want something light.
Servings Prep Time
4 People 15 Mins
Cook Time
10 Mins
Servings Prep Time
4 People 15 Mins
Cook Time
10 Mins
Ingredients
Servings: People
Instructions
  1. Heat the oil.
  2. Add mustard seeds and let them splutter.
  3. Add udad dal and stir-fry till the dal turns light golden brown.
  4. Add the green chillies and curry leaves.
  5. Stir-fry for a few seconds.
  6. Add the tomato pieces.
  7. Cook over low-medium flame till the tomato pieces are stewed.
  8. Add turmeric, salt and sugar.
  9. Mix well and wait for the sugar to dissolve.
  10. Add the grated carrot and mix well.
  11. Turn the heat to low and cook covered for 3 to 5 minutes.
  12. Mix well and turn off the heat.
  13. Serve hot with Rotis.
Recipe Notes
  • Do not over cook the carrot. All you need is for the carrot to just soften a touch.
  • This curry has a crunch to it.
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Grated Carrot Curry
Grated Carrot Curry

Steamed Methi Muthiya: A Healthy Delicious Snack from Gujarat

Steamed Methi Muthiya | A Gujarati Snack
Steamed Methi Muthiya | A Gujarati Snack

I like making Steamed Methi Muthiya for many reasons. First, I love fresh Methi (Fenugreek leaves) and try to use it in as many ways as possible. Second, I am on a weight-loss journey and am looking for healthy yet delicious snacks. Third, this recipe yields the perfect Methi Muthiya; firm yet crumbly, spicy, and light on the stomach. What more can one ask for.

Are you a lover of Methi too? Here is a collection methi recipes for you to try.

Methi Muthiya is a popular snack in the Western Indian state of Gujarat. There are two variants of this dish: the deep-fried version and the steamed version. I have already written about the Deep-fried Methi Muthia when I used them for making Undhiyu. Today, I am writing about Steamed Methi Muthiya which is eaten a tea-time snack.

This tea-time treat is easy to make and the ingredients are most commonly found in Indian homes. While it is a dish best enjoyed fresh, you refrigerate the Muthia to make them last longer. What I love about this snack is that it is healthy, filling and delicious. I use it as my 4 PM treat and it helps me stay away from unhealthy Chaat or fried snacks.

This is also a great way to get children to eat loads of Methi, which they otherwise find bitter.

Do also try Kothimbir Vadi, Maharashtra’s answer to Gujarat’s Methi Muthiya. 🙂

How to Make Steamed Methi Muthiya

 

Steamed Methi Muthia
Steamed Methi Muthiya: A Healthy Delicious Snack from Gujarat
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Print Recipe
Steamed Methi Muthia is a delicious and healthy snack from Gujarat made with fresh fenugreek leaves, wheat flour, and gram flour. Enjoy it with a piping hot cup of Masala Chai.
Servings Prep Time
4 People 10 Mins
Cook Time Passive Time
20 Mins 15 Mins
Servings Prep Time
4 People 10 Mins
Cook Time Passive Time
20 Mins 15 Mins
Steamed Methi Muthia
Steamed Methi Muthiya: A Healthy Delicious Snack from Gujarat
Yum
Print Recipe
Steamed Methi Muthia is a delicious and healthy snack from Gujarat made with fresh fenugreek leaves, wheat flour, and gram flour. Enjoy it with a piping hot cup of Masala Chai.
Servings Prep Time
4 People 10 Mins
Cook Time Passive Time
20 Mins 15 Mins
Servings Prep Time
4 People 10 Mins
Cook Time Passive Time
20 Mins 15 Mins
Ingredients
Ingredients for Methi Muthiya
Ingredients for Tempering
Servings: People
Instructions
Making the Dough for Methi Muthiya
  1. Chop the fenugreek leaves. Wash them and set aside to drain in a colander.
  2. Mix together atta, besan, red chilli powder, turmeric, green chilli paste, ginger paste, sesame seeds, sugar, and salt.
    Methi Muthia Ingredients
  3. Add the chopped and washed methi leaves. Mix well
    Add Chopped Washed Methi Leaves
  4. Add the lemon juice. Mix well.
    Mix Methi, Flour, and Lemon Juice
  5. Using a little water, mix to create a firm yet pliable dough.
  6. Add 1 tbsp oil. Mix well.
    Methi Muthia Dough
  7. Set aside for 5 minutes.
Making the Methi Muthiya
  1. Divide the dough into 2 halves.
  2. Roll each half into a log about 1.5" in diameter.
  3. In a pressure cooker or steamer, add enough water for a 7-10 minute steam.
  4. Bring the water to a boil.
  5. Place the rolls in a steamer or a flat colander.
    Make a Roll
  6. Steam the rolls for 7 to 10 minutes.
  7. Turn off the heat and let the rolls cool a bit.
  8. Cut the steamed rolls into 1/2" slices.
Tempering the Methi Muthiya
  1. In a pan, heat the oil.
  2. Add the mustard seeds and wait till they splutter.
  3. Add the sesame seeds, curry leaves, and hing.
  4. Stir-fry for a few seconds.
  5. Add the Methi Muthiya.
  6. With a gentle hand, stir-fry for 3 to 5 minutes till the muthia just start to change colour.
  7. Serve hot with a cup of Masala Chai.
Recipe Notes
  • Be careful not to over steam the Muthia; otherwise they will become tough.
  • You could add a pinch of cooking soda or fruit salt (Eno) to the dough. If you do choose to do this, make sure it is just a pinch.
  • I found that I did not need too much water because the moisture in the washed leaves and the lemon juice is quite sufficient to make the dough.
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Recipes for Basant Panchami | Vasant Panchami | Shree Panchami

Recipes for Basant Panchami | Shree Panchami | Vasant Panchami
Recipes for Basant Panchami | Shree Panchami | Vasant Panchami

February 1, 2017 will be celebrated as Basant Panchami | Vasant Panchami in North and East India. It is also called Shree Panchami and is the day for Saraswati Puja in parts of Bengal and Bihar.

I was rather unaware of this festival till I met Madhumita, who is now one of my closest friends. A Bengali to the core, Madhumita and her family are also responsible for introducing me to many lesser-known delights of Bengali Cuisine. Every year, without fail, Madhumita will remind me of Saraswati Puja and Durga Puja; and this year was no different.

I will try to make something uniquely commemorative of the festival tomorrow, but in the meantime, here is a collection of some recipes that can be made to celebrate Basant Panchami.

Vasant Panchami literally means the fifth day of spring. Also, yellow is a colour associated with this festival.

A Collection of Bengali Recipes for Shree Panchami

A COLLECTION OF Punjabi RECIPES FOR BASANT PANCHAMI

Some Sweets for Vasant Panchami

  • Chawal ke Kheer. Kheer is such an indispensable part of Indian festive meals.
  • Rava Kesari. Another traditional favourite; Suji halwa flavoured with saffron.
  • Sojjappalu. Rava Kesari stuffed Puris that are popular in Andhra Pradesh.

 

Makar Sankranti Recipes | Pongal Recipes

Collection Makar Sankranti Recipes from Andhra Pradesh and Maharashtra
Collection Makar Sankranti Recipes from Andhra Pradesh and Maharashtra

Makara Sankranti is one of those festivals that is celebrated across the length and breadth of India, albeit under various names. Typically, celebrated over 2 to 4 days, it marks the start of Uttarayanam or  the 6-month period which marks the the passage of the Sun northwards towards the Tropic of Cancer.

Hindus believe that the 6 months of Uttarayanam corresponds to 1 day for the Gods while the 6 months of Dakshinayanam, when the Sun moves southwards towards the Tropic of Capricorn corresponds to 1 night for the Gods. 🙂

Makara Sankranti is also the harvest festival and so a day to celebrate the fresh harvest. A lot of the dishes made on this day include freshly harvested produce such as rice, sugarcane, etc.

One combination that is common to Makara Sankrati celebrations across India is Til and Gud or Sesame and Jaggery. You will find people across India making sweets such as Til ke Laddoo (or Tilgul as it is called in Maharashtra) or Gajak.

It is a day to celebrate and typically every family has a feast at home. Here are some Sankranti Recipes that you can include in this feast.

Using new rice is a big part of Sankranti celebrations in the South. You can make:

Do you want healthier options of the traditional dishes? Try these Sankranti Recipes for Rava Pongal and Kuthiraivali Pongal | Udalu Katte Pongali |Barnyard Millet Pongal.

Of course, no celebration in Andhra Pradesh is complete without Pulihora. Try one of these different versions:

No celebrations are ever complete without sweets or desserts, so here are a few you could make:

Sesame and peanuts are popular ingredients for Sankranti celebrations.

And how can one forget the one dish that is a must in all South India festival feasts; Garelu or Ulundu Vada. You could also use the Garelu to make Perugu Garelu.

Happy Sankranti All!