Saag Paneer with Palak, Hara Lasun & Hara Pyaaz: Recipe by Heena Jhanglani

I learnt this recipe for aromatic, delectable Saag Paneer (Palak Paneer) from Heena Jhanglani. Her daughter had carried just the curry base (without the Paneer) for lunch one day and told me it was just another type of Sai Bhaji (or a dish made with greens). I took that basic recipe and added some Paneer to it to make this wonderful Palak Paneer with a Difference.

Saag Paneer with Palak, Hara Lehsun, and Hara Pyaaz
Saag Paneer with Palak, Hara Lehsun, and Hara Pyaaz

Heena Jhanglani is quite a treasure trove of recipes and continues to surprise me ever so often with the stuff she sends in her daughter’s lunch box. This Saag Paneer/Palak Paneer is just another example of that skill.

Traditional Palak Paneer uses just spinach to create the green base. This recipe uses spring onions with the greens as well as generous dose of green garlic chives. This lends the dish a unique flavour and texture that sets it apart from the traditional Palak Paneer.

I am quite in love with this flavour rich version of Palak Paneer and will make it every time I find spring onions and green garlic chives. 🙂  Thank you, Heena-ji, for this wonderful recipe. Keep them coming!

Saag Paneer with Green Garlic Chives and Spring Onions
Saag Paneer with Green Garlic Chives and Spring Onions

How to Make Saag Paneer/Palak Paneer with Spinach, Spring Onions, and Green Garlic Chives

Saag Paneer/Palak Paneer with Spinach, Spring Onions, and Green Garlic
Prep Time
10 mins
Cook Time
25 mins
Total Time
30 mins
 

I learnt this wonderful recipe for Saag Paneer/Palak Paneer with Spinach, Spring Onions, and Green Garlic from Heena Jhanglani and it is set to become a staple in my home.

Course: Accompaniments, Main Course
Cuisine: Indian, Sindhi
Servings: 4 People
Author: Aruna
Ingredients
  • 1 Large Bunch Palak Approx 250 gms
  • 1 Small Bunch Green Garlic, Hara Lahsun Approx 100 gms
  • 2-3 Spring Onions Approx 100 gms
  • 150 gms Paneer
  • 2-3 Slit Green Chillies
  • 1/2 tsp Haldi
  • 1 tbsp Oil
  • Salt to Taste
Instructions
The Prep
  1. Chop Paneer into 1" cubes.

  2. Chop the Palak to small pieces.

  3. Separate the tender garlic from the chives.

  4. Chop the garlic. Set aside.

  5. Chop the green garlic chives. Set aside.

  6. Separate the spring onion from the greens.

  7. Slice the spring onion. Set aside.

  8. Chop the spring onion greens. Set aside.

Making the Saag Paneer | Palak Paneer
  1. In a kadhai, heat the oil.

  2. Add the sliced spring onions and garlic pieces.

  3. Stir-fry till aromatic.

  4. Add the slit green chillies, green garlic chives, and spring onion greens.

  5. Stir-fry for about 1 minute.

  6. Add turmeric and stir-fry for a few seconds.

  7. Add the chopped palak and stir-fry till wilted.

  8. Add salt. Mix well.

  9. Turn off the heat and let the greens cool a bit.

  10. Using a bit of water, grind to a smooth paste.

  11. Transfer the paste back to the kadhai and stir-fry a bit.

  12. Add enough water to form a thick gravy.

  13. Add the chopped paneer and cook for a few minutes.

  14. Serve hot with rotis.

 

Saag Paneer | Palak Paneer
Saag Paneer | Palak Paneer

Saag Paneer/Palak Paneer Recipe with Step-by-Step Instructions

  1. Getting Things Ready
    1. Cut the Paneer into 1″ cubes. You can lightly pan-fry them, if you so wish. I used Paneer “as is”.
    2. Separate the garlic from the greens.
    3. Separate the spring onions from the greens.
    4. Chop the spinach, green garlic chives, and spring onion greens into small pieces.
    5. Chop the garlic into small pieces. Set aside.
    6. Slice the spring onions. Set aside.
  2. Making the Aromatic Saag Paneer 
    1. In a heavy-bottomed vessel or kadhai, over medium flame, heat the oil.
    2. Once the oil is hot, add the sliced spring onions and garlic pieces.
    3. Stir-fry till the onions just turn transparent and the garlic becomes aromatic.
    4. Next, add the green chillies, green garlic chives and spring onion greens.
    5. Stir-fry for a few seconds. The green garlic chives and spring onion greens do not need much stir-frying and wilt pretty quickly.
    6. Add the turmeric and mix well.
    7. Add the chopped spinach and stir-fry till the palak is cooked and softens.
    8. When the palak wilts a bit, add the salt.
    9. Mix well.
    10. Take the kadhai off the flame and let the cooked greens mix cool.
    11. Transfer the cooked mix to a grinder along with a little water.
    12. Grind the greens to a thick, smooth paste.
    13. Transfer the ground paste back to the kadhai and cook the mix a bit.
    14. Add about 1/2 cup of water to the cooked paste and mix well to form a thick gravy.
    15. Add paneer pieces to the gravy and let the Saag Paneer simmer a bit.
  3. Serve hot, aromatic Palak Paneer | Saag Paneer with rotis.
Palak Paneer with Green Garlic Chives and Spring Onions
Palak Paneer with Green Garlic Chives and Spring Onions

Surnoli | A Sweet Dosa from Saraswat Cuisine

Surnoli is a wonderful light-on-the-stomach sweet dosa made with rice, coconut and jaggery. From what I have read on the Internet, it is a part of the Saraswat cuisine and is quite a popular breakfast in Goa, Mangalore and other such regions where there is  a concentration of Saraswat Brahmins.

Surnoli | A Sweet Dosa for Breakfast in Mangalore and Goa
Surnoli | A Sweet Dosa for Breakfast in Mangalore and Goa

What fascinated me about Surnoli was its golden hue and its fluffy, porous texture. I have seen stacks of Surnoli posted in various Konkani food groups and have always been meaning to try it. I got the perfect opportunity this month when I got Rice and Coconut as my secret ingredient to make a dish from Goa was the theme this month on the Shhhhh Cooking Secretly Challenge group.

My partner for this month’s challenge is Priya Satheesh who blogs at Priya’s Menu. She has just started a #100Chutneys series that is simply stupendous. Do take the time to visit her blog and try her recipes.

Coming back to the Surnoli recipe, it is everything I imagined it to be and more. It is soft, fluffy, and just the right amount of sweet. My family and I savoured it with various accompaniments: white butter, spicy mango pickle, and tangy lime pickle. Each and every combination was a hit.

How to Make Surnoli: The Sweet Dosa from Saraswat Cuisine of Goa and Mangalore

Surnoli | A Sweet Dosa from the Saraswat Cuisine (Goa and Mangalore)
Prep Time
10 mins
Cook Time
20 mins
Total Time
30 mins
 

Surnoli is a sweet dosa made with rice, coconut and jaggery. It is from the Saraswat cuisine and is a popular breakfast in Goa and Mangalore. All you need is some white butter or spicy mango pickle on the side. 

Course: Breakfast, Snack
Cuisine: Goa, Indian, Mangalore, Saraswat
Servings: 4 Surnoli
Author: Aruna
Ingredients
  • 1/2 Cup Rice
  • 1/4 Cup Poha
  • 1/4 Cup Grated Coconut
  • 1/4 Cup Grated Jaggery
  • 1/4 Cup Dahi, Yogurt
  • 0.25 tsp Methi Dana
  • 1/2 tsp Turmeric
  • 2 Large Pinches Salt
  • 1/4 tsp Eno
  • Water, If required
  • Butter or Oil to Make Surnoli
Instructions
Making the Batter
  1. Wash the rice well under running water.

  2. Soak the rice and methi in 1.5 cups water for at least 4 hours.

  3. Just before grinding, add the poha to the rice and let it soak for 1-2 minutes.

  4. Drain all the water.

  5. Grind together the soaked rice+methi+poha, jaggery, coconut, dahi, turmeric and salt to a smooth thick batterof pourable consistency. Add a little water, if required. Do not  add too much water or the batter will not ferment well.

  6. Let the batter ferment for 6 hours or more.

Making the Dosa
  1. Just before making the dosa, add Eno and mix with a gentle hand. If your batter has fermented very well, you may want to skip the Eno.

  2. Over medium flame, heat a flat tava or a griddle and grease it with a little butter or oil.

  3. Pour a large ladle of batter in the centre and let the batter spread by itself. Do not spread like for a dosa.

  4. Cover and cook for 2-3 minutes. The surface of the Surnoli should be porous and cooked.

  5. Serve Surnoli hot with butter, mango pickle, or onion chutney.

Recipe Notes
  • The addition of Eno just gives you a more porous Surnoli. If your batter is very well fermented, you can omit it.

 

Recipe with Step-by-Step Instructions to Make Surnoli, A Sweet Dosa

  1. Making the Surnoli Batter
    1. Wash the rice well till the water runs clear.
    2. Soak the rice and the fenugreek seeds in enough water for about 4 to 6 hours.
    3. After the rice has soaked, drain all the water from it.
    4. Just before you grind the batter for Surnoli, wash the poha well under running water and add to the wet poha to the drained rice. I just add the poha to the water the rice is soaking in and then drain everything together. If you are using the thin variety of poha (patal pohe), just add it as is while grinding without washing.
    5. To a large mixer grinder, add the the soaked rice, fenugreek seeds, poha, jaggery, coconut, dahi, turmeric and salt.
    6. Grind to a smooth thick batter that is pourable consistency. Add a little water, if required.

    7. Transfer the ground batter to a vessel. Cover and set aside for at least 6 6 hours for the batter to ferment. You can speed up the fermentation by using sour dahi.
  2. Cooking the Surnoli
    1. If you want a really fluffy Surnoli, just before it, gently mix Eno into the batter and wait for 5 minutes.
    2. In the meantime, over low to medium flame, heat a flat tava. Do not use high heat because the jaggery in the batter will cause the Surnoli to caramelize and burn quickly.
    3. Add a pat of butter or few drop of oil and grease the surface well.
    4. When the tava is hot, pour a large ladle of batter in the middle of the tava and let the batter flow into a thick dosa by itself. Do not spread like for a dosa.

    5. Cover the dosa and let it cook for a couple of minutes. Lift the cover at regular interval to check if the surface is cooked and porous.
    6. Using a flat spatula loosen the edges and remove the Surnoli into a plate. Do not flip over and cook.
  3. Serve the warm Surnoli with butter, mango pickle, or onion chutney on the side.
Surnoli | A Dosa with Rice, Coconut and Jaggery
Surnoli | A Dosa with Rice, Coconut and Jaggery

Andhra Senaga Pindi Pachadi | Bombay Chutney | Besan Chatni for Idli

One of my favourite breakfast items is soft, fluffy Idli, What can elevate this simple dumpling to a gastronomic delight is Senaga Pindi Pachadi (Besan ki Chutney | Gram Flour Chutney).  You will find this pachadi served often in many Andhra homes, but I have not seen it elsewhere.

Senaga Pindi Pachadi for Idlis
Senaga Pindi Pachadi for Idlis

This chutney is also popularly called Bombay Chutney in South India. I guess that’s because someone change the recipe for the Maharashtrian Pithla to arrive at this recipe. A rose by any name….

This particular version of the Senaga Pindi Pachadi is my father’s speciality. For as long as I can remember, Daddy has been the only one in our home to make this pachadi. He would not even allow my mother to make it. Daddy would get up early in the day to patiently roast the senaga pindi (besan or gram flour) till it was just turning brown and then letting it cool before he sieved it. He would then rope in my brother or me to spoon the sieved besan into water while he mixed it in to ensure there are no lumps. Then we were banished from the kitchen till he completed making it.

Daddy is very, very particular about how he makes it and the quality of help we render. 🙂 Believe you me, the first time I made this under his supervision, I was sweating bullets!

Do try this pachadi as it is so simple to make and tastes great along with hot idlis and chutney powder. As a bonus, it is also an healthy alternative to coconut chutney!

Bombay Chutney is made with Besan or Gram Flour. It is usually served with Idlis
Bombay Chutney | Besan Chutney for Idlis

How to Make Andhra Senaga Pindi Pachadi | Bombay Chutney | Besan Chutney for Idli

Senaga Pindi Pachadi | Bombay Chutney | Besan Chatni for Idli
Prep Time
10 mins
Cook Time
10 mins
Total Time
20 mins
 

This is a super easy chutney made with gram flour (besan) and is eaten with Idlis in Andhra Pradesh. It is also popular in Tamil Nadu and is often called Bombay Chutney

Course: Accompaniments
Cuisine: Andhra Recipes, Indian Food, Vegan, Vegetarian
Author: Aruna
Ingredients
For the Chutney
  • 1/2 Cup Senaga Pindi, Besan
  • 1 tbsp Thick Tamarind Extract
  • 1/8 tsp Turmeric
  • 1.5 Cups Water
  • Salt to Taste
For Tadka/Popu
  • 2 tsp Oil
  • 1/2 tsp Mustard Seeds, Rai, Avalu
  • 1/2 tsp Cumin Seeds, Jeera, Jeelakarra
  • 2-3 Dried Red Chillies
  • 4-6 Curry Leaves
Instructions
  1. Dissolve the tamarind pulp in /2 cup water. Set aside.

  2. Over low heat, dry roast the besan till aromatic and till it just starts to change colour.

  3. Take off the heat and let it cool a bit.

  4. Add the turmeric and 1/2 the tamarind water.

  5. Mix quickly to form a smooth paste.

  6. Gradually add the rest of the tamarind water and 1 cup water. 

  7. Mix well to form a thick liquid.

  8. Add salt.

  9. Now place the kadhai back on low heat and cook the Senaga Pindi Pachadi till it is thick and translucent.

  10. Take off the heat.

  11. In a ladle heat the oil.

  12. Add the mustard seeds and wait till they splutter.

  13. Add the cumin seeds, curry leaves, and split red chillies.

  14. Stir-fry for a few seconds.

  15. Add to the Senaga Pindi Pachadi and mix well.

  16. Serve the Senaga Pindi Pachadi | Bombay Chutney | Besan ki Chatni hot with idlis.

 

Recipe with Step-by-Step Instructions to Make Andhra Senaga Pindi Pachadi | Bombay Chutney | Besan Chatni for Idli

  1. Getting the Tamarind Water Ready
    1. Dissolve the tamarind pulp in 1/2 cup water.
    2. Set aside.
  2. Getting the Besan Ready
    1. In a heavy-bottomed kadai, over medium heat, dry roast the besan till it starts changing colour and becomes aromatic. Stir continuously as your roast the besan else it tends to burn.
    2. Turn off the heat and let the besan cool a bit.
  3. Making the Senaga Pindi Pachadi | Bombay Chutney | Besan ki Chatni
    1. After the besan has cooled, add the turmeric and 1/2 the tamarind water to it.
    2. Mix well to form a smooth paste.
    3. Now, while stirring continuously, add the remaining tamarind water and an additional 3/4 cup of water.
    4. Whisk well to form a thick liquid.
    5. Now over medium flame, while stirring continuously, cook the besan mix till it becomes thick (like custard) and glossy.
    6. Take off the heat.
    7. In a heavy ladle, heat the oil.
    8. Add mustard seeds and when they splutter, add the cumin seeds.
    9. Now add split red chillies and curry leaves.
    10. Stir-fry for about 10 seconds.
    11. Add the tempering to the Senaga Pindi Pachadi.
  4. Mix well.
  5. Serve Senaga Pindi Pachadi | Bombay Chutney hot with idlis.

Tips

Do ensure that:

  • the senaga pindi is sieved well.
  • the senaga pindi pachadi has no lumps.
  • you stir the senaga pindi pachadi constantly when cooking. Otherwise, it will become a lumpy mess.
  • you eat the senaga pindi pachadi hot because when it cools, it tends to congeal. 🙁
Andhra Senaga Pindi Pachadi for Idlis
Andhra Senaga Pindi Pachadi for Idlis

Maddur Vada: A Delicious Tea-Time Snack from Karnataka

When I decide to try any recipe that involves deep-frying, there is quite a flutter in my home as I avoid deep-frying as much as possible. So this weekend as I got ready to make delicious Maddur Vada, I had quite an audience in amused family members.

Maddur Vada | A Delicious Tea Time Snack from Karnataka
Maddur Vada | A Delicious Tea Time Snack from Karnataka

Jokes aside, I have been wanting to make Maddur Vada at home for ages and decided to make it this Saturday just on a whim. It is a recipe that transforms ingredients commonly found in Indian homes—rice flour, semolina, maida (APF), chillies, and curry leaves—into a delicious snack.

What I loved about Maddur Vada is despite the deep-frying it did not absorb any oil, and had a light crispness on the outside while being soft on the inside. So even the Octagenarians in my home could enjoy it without much trouble.

Like Chitti Boorelu, Punugulu, and Goli Bhajje, Maddur Vada turned out to be the perfect accompaniment to my evening tumbler of Kaapi.

How to Make the Perfect Maddur Vada

Maddur Vada | Crispy Tea Time Snack
Prep Time
10 mins
Cook Time
30 mins
Total Time
40 mins
 

Maddur Vada is just the perfect snack to accompany your evening cup of tea or coffee. You can make it in a jiffy with ingredients commonly found in Indian homes.

Course: Snack, Snacks
Cuisine: Indian, Karnataka
Servings: 12 Maddur Vada
Author: Aruna
Ingredients
  • 1/2 Cup Rice Flour
  • 1/4 Cup Rava (Semolina)
  • 1/4 Cup Maida (APF)
  • 1/3 Cup Finely Chopped Onion
  • 3-4 Finely Chopped Green Chillies
  • 10-16 Finely Chopped Curry Leaves
  • 1 Pinch Hing (Aasfoetida)
  • Salt to Taste
  • Oil for Deep Frying
  • Water for Making the Dough
Other Requirements
  • Banana Leaf or Plastic Sheet
Instructions
Making the Dough
  1. In a large bowl, mix together the rice flour, maida, rava, chillies, curry leaves, hing, and salt.

  2. Mix well.

  3. Heat about 2 tbsp oil till its hot and add the flour mix.

  4. Use a spoon to quickly mix the oil into the flour.

  5. Now slowly add water and make a tight but pliable dough.

Making the Maddur Vade
  1. In a kadhai, on medium flame, heat enough oil to deep fry to Maddur Vade. To test the heat, drop a tiny ball of dough into the oil. It should rise to the top and sizzle moderately on the surface.

  2. Divide the dough into 12 equal portions. Keep covered.

  3. Use 1 or 2 drops oil to grease a plastic sheet or a banana leaf.

  4. Roll one portion of the dough into a ball and place on the oiled sheet.

  5. Use a greased fingers to pat the dough ball into a circle about 2.5" in diameter and about 1/4" thick.

  6. Slide the Maddur Vada into the oil.

  7. Fry on medium heat till the side facing the bottom is golden brown. Flip over and fry till the flip side is golden brown as well. See notes.

  8. Using a slotted ladle, remove the fried Maddur Vada from the oil and drain excess oil.

  9. Serve hot with Coconut Chutney.

Recipe Notes
  • Fry the Maddur Vade on moderate heat because otherwise you will have Vade that are fried on the outside but raw on the inside.
  • A simple way of detecting if your oil is too hot is to see if blisters form on the outside of the Maddur Vada. If there are, the oil is too hot.

Maddur Vada
Maddur Vada

Recipe with Step-by-Step Instructions to Make the Perfect Maddur Vada

  1. The First Step: Making the Maddur Vada Dough
    1. In a large bowl, combine the rice flour, maida, rava, chillies, curry leaves, hing, and salt.
    2. Mix all the ingredients well and make a small well in the middle.
    3. Using a ladle, heat 2 tbsp oil and add it to the dry ingredients.
    4. Using a spoon, quickly mix the oil into the dry ingredients. This oil helps make the Maddur Vada softer on the inside and also helps it cook well when we deep-fry.
    5. Now add small quantities of water and knead the ingredients together to make a dough that is just soft enough so that it can be shaped into small discs. If the dough is very stiff, the Maddur Vada will break as you are trying to shape them. If the dough is too soft, the Vade will absorb oil when you fry them.

  2. Shaping and Frying the Maddur Vade
    1. To a kadhai, add about 1.5 cups of oil to deep fry to Maddur Vade. You need about a 2″ deep layer of oil. I use a small but deep kadhai.
    2. On a medium flame, heat the oil till it is moderately hot. To test the heat, drop a tiny ball of dough into the oil. It should rise slowly to the surface and sizzle with moderate intensity. If you oil is too hot, the Maddur Vada will cook very quickly on the surface and also form blisters on the surface, but the inside will remain raw. If your oil is cold, the vada will absorb oil as they fry. 
    3. Divide the dough into 12 equal portions and roll each portion into a ball. Keep covered. I found that one portion of dough is roughly what I could scoop with a standard baking tablespoon (tbsp).

    4. Lightly grease a plastic sheet or banana leaf using 1 or 2 drops oil.
    5. Place one portion of the dough on the greased sheet and press into a thick disc about 2.5″ in diameter. If the disc is very thin, then you have have a very crisp Maddur Vada much like a Thattai | Chekkalu.
    6. Gently, transfer the disc onto your fingers and slide it into the oil.
    7. Let the Maddur Vade Fry on medium heat till the side facing the bottom is golden brown.
    8. Gently flip over the Vada and fry till the other side is golden brown.
    9. Remove the fried Maddur Vada from the oil and drain excess oil.
  3. Serve hot with Hotel Style Coconut Chutney.
Maddur Vade
Maddur Vade

Khus Khus Halwa | Gasagasala Halwa | Post ka Halwa

Poppy seeds or Khus Khus (also called gasagasalu in Telugu) are known for their somnolent or sleep inducing properties. So, last week when my father was unwell and not sleeping to well, I made this Khus Khus Halwa for him.  As a bonus, since he likes sweets, it also made him happy to eat it. 🙂

A Bowl of Khus Khus Halwa | Gasagasala Halwa | Poppy Seeds Halwa
Khus Khus Halwa | Gasagasala Halwa | Poppy Seeds Halwa

Called Khus Khus Jo Seero in Sindh, Post ka Halwa in Himachal Pradesh, and Gasagasala Hawla in Telugu, this dessert is very easy to make and is quite popular across India. It is essentially a solid version of the Gasagasala Payasam |Khus Khus Kheer I have written about earlier.

Khus Khus or Poppy Seeds are much maligned (banned in some countries) because they are the base from which opium and morphine are produced. If we can look past this fact, we will realise that Poppy Seeds are are highly nutritious with high concentrations of iron, calcium, phosphorous, and zinc.

A moderate consumption of Khus Khus is actually quite beneficial for health. One way to use khus khus is to soak and grind it to a fine paste, and then add this creamy paste to gravies or in place of/in addition to ground onion, etc.

Coming back to Khus Khus Halwa, the focus should be on soaking the poppy seeds well because otherwise the halwa will have a rather unpalatable grainy texture because poppy seeds are notoriously difficult to grind. The rest of the recipe is rather easy. 🙂

Khus Khus Halwa | Post ka Halwa | Gasagasala Halwa
Khus Khus Halwa | Post ka Halwa | Gasagasala Halwa

How to Make Khus Khus Halwa | Gasagasala Halwa | Post ka Halwa | Poppy Seeds Halwa

Khus Khus Halwa | Gasagasala Halwa | Post ka Halwa | Poppy Seeds Halwa

Khus Khus Halwa or Poppy Seeds Halwa is super easy to make and quite different in taste from other halwas. Called Gasagasala Halwa in Telugu, this dessert is not overly sweet and hits just the right notes post a heavy meal.

Course: Dessert, Sweets
Cuisine: Himachal Pradesh, Indian Food
Servings: 6 Servings
Author: Aruna
Ingredients
  • 100 gms Khus Khus, Gasagasalu, Poppy Seeds
  • 100 gms Sugar
  • 225 ml Milk
  • 3 tbsp Ghee
  • 1 tsp Cardamom Powder
  • 2-3 tbsp Sliced Almonds
Instructions
  1. In about 2 cups of water, soak the khus khus overnight (or for at least 8 hours).

  2. Drain all the water from the khus khus.

  3. Grind the soaked khus khus to a fine paste.  Use a little water or milk if needed.

  4. In a large heavy bottomed kadai or pan, over medium heat, heat 2 tbsp ghee.

  5. Add the poppy seeds paste and saute till it becomes aromatic and just starts to change colour.

  6. Turn the heat to low, add the sugar and cardamom powder, and mix well.

  7. Gradually add the milk and mix well.

  8. Mix well to ensure there are no lumps.

  9. Over medium heat, let the Khus Khus Halwa cook till the milk is fully absorbed and the poppy seed paste is well cooked. Stir at regular intervals.

  10. Turn the heat off and transfer the Khus Khus Halwa into a serving bowl.

  11. Drizzle the remaining ghee and garnish with the almond slivers.

  12. Enjoy hot!

 

Recipe with Step-by-Step Instructions to Make Khus Khus Halwa | Gasagasala Halwa | Post ka Halwa | Poppy Seeds Halwa

  1. Soaking the Poppy Seeds: The Most Important Step
    1. Cover the poppy seeds with enough water and soak them overnight (or for at least 8 hours). If you do not soak the poppy seeds enough, they will be difficult to grind and/or cook.

    2. Drain all the water from the poppy seeds. I used a soup strainer.

    3. Using a little milk, grind the soaked poppy seeds to a fine paste.
  2. Making the Khus Khus Halwa | Gasagasala Halwa | Post ka Halwa
    1. Choose a a heavy bottomed kadai large enough to mix the halwa comfortably.
    2. Over a medium flame, heat the kadhai and melt 2 tbsp ghee.
    3. To the melted ghee, add the poppy seeds paste.
    4. Stir-fry the poppy seed paste till it starts to change colour and becomes aromatic.
    5. Reduce the heat to low, and add the sugar and cardamom powder to the fried poppy paste.
    6. Mix well and stir-fry for about a minute.
    7. When the sugar is well-incorporated, add the milk.
    8. Immediately mix well to ensure that the poppy seed mix blends well with the milk with no lumps.
    9. Over medium heat, cook the mix till the milk is fully absorbed and the poppy seed paste is well cooked. Keep stirring at regular intervals to ensure that the halwa does not stick to the kadhai.
  3. When the Khus Khus Halwa is cooked, remove it from the heat off and transfer the into a serving bowl.
  4. Melt and drizzle the remaining ghee on the Halwa.
  5. Garnish with the almond slivers.
  6. Serve hot!
Gasagasala Halwa | Poppy Seeds Halwa | Post ka Halwa
Gasagasala Halwa | Poppy Seeds Halwa | Post ka Halwa